The battle of Worcester in 1651 was the attempt by the eldest son of Charles I to reclaim the throne and to re-establish the rule of the Crown in England. The Worcester Campaign, 1651 W hile Oliver Cromwell and the Commonwealth army in Scotland advanced on Perth, Charles II asserted his authority as commander-in-chief of the Scots-Royalist army and ordered an advance into England. Keith and the Scots, Scottish allies under Sir David Leslie initially held their position at Powick bridge against the … There may have been others not listed and some names cannot be read, so they will appear in …

An incomplete list of Scots who were sent to New England in 1650 appeared in the Iron Works papers in 1653. Prisoners from the Battle of Worcester (1651) Note: a contemporary list of 272 Scots transported on board the John and Sarah from Worcester exists in the Suffolk Deeds, and these are the A list Worcester prisoners. As many as 400 Scottish POWS captured in the Battles of Worcester and Dunbar were shipped to New England in the 1650s as temporary slaves to work in iron mills, saw mills and farms.. Across the sea, Oliver Cromwell’s new government had the costly and vexing task of managing thousands of Scottish POWs. The Scottish prisoners found on this website are prisoners of war from two battles of the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, the first, in Scotland and, the second, in England. In the following years, many Scots who were were taken prisoners at the Battle of Worcester [England] were sent to Virginia, Massachusetts, and Maine aboard the John and Sara. On 03 Sep 1650, the BATTLE OF DUNBAR , took place at Dunbar, Scotland and resulted in many Scottish prisoners of war being marched to Durham Cathedral where they were kept before being moved on to other places. The Great Migration of Puritans had ended, and the colonists badly needed workers.